Tag Archives: art

A little more water

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… while I had the chance.

 

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Insularity

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Yesterday I went bounding off – well, stepping out – and once past the industrial estate the walking was pleasant:  a beautiful September day.  I was more interested in terraces than in tourism, and the itinerary did not include the pilgrimage destination, the Big House, or the italianate church looking bizarre among chalk and flint cottages.

It did, however, include the local garden centre as a possible watering hole.  This was fortunate.  I reached the junction named baldly (but exactly) Park Wall, and fell flat on my face, taking the knee out of my favourite walking trousers and myself.  The garden centre supplied running water, tea, teacake, and plasters, and the excursion turned into a jigsaw hunt instead.

Found in a charity shop.  Once you look, it is amusing to note the subtext of the image: apparently Manhattan residents are even more insular than other island dwellers.  🙂

The image also contains, of course, a great many ghosts.

Well that was busy

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After significant wrestling with rugs, curtains, windows, tables, books, boxes, bargains, shoes, and incoming parcels, we got to the serious stuff.

This included corporate creativity in order to adjust the fascinator with two pairs of heavy duty pliers and superglue (a treasurable experience)

and discovering that we female rellies from far-flung places had instinctively colour-co-ordinated ourselves.

The view from the back of the portaloos was the best I have ever seen from a lavatory (the other aspects were good too) and strop didn’t seem to break out until later.  All good.

Meantime, writing a level 7 assignment with the other foot … yes, that worked.  Writing is agony, but here is a keeper (especially since I discovered that St Menas may have won the Battle of El Alamein):

It was lonely without the sky so in a heavily symbolic act … I may have overbought.  It came today,

and I have been using the cathedral spire to align the red dot finder.  Can’t see the spire?  The scope can.  In fact it can count each red warning light and the knobs on the cross on top.

But can it see anything else?  Naturally, the moon is rising behind a band of high cloud and has turned itself into a gigantic fuzzball.  Isn’t astronomy wonderful?

On not doing Christmas shopping

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I have left the snowflakes behind, supplied the mice in the attic with a treacherous Christmas dinner (O please not rats), and may or may not have locked the back door.  The shops in Salisbury are much better than those at home, but there are ways of not shopping, thus:

First go to the local library to look at the Kathe Kollwitz exhibition, and look very carefully at her looking very carefully at herself.

Then go to St Thomas’ and contemplate the Doom painting.

After this, proceed through the darkening crowded streets and brightly lighted shops, solitary, disorientated, and immune to temptation, and purchase one spoon.

Returning, I finished reading a book which in some places became a time machine

and now I have to choose the next title from a selection.  One for night and one for day.

The march of the blue labels

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They have reached W now.  Hurray!

In another vein, I found this little treasure.

I expect everyone else knows about Tan, but I didn’t.  Grandpa’s story had great charm, and Night of the turtle rescue was brief and bold (and tough).  But I think my favourite was Distant rain, about the reciprocal gravity of unread poems; close to my heart.

Lumpy

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We only have the edge of the storm, and the sea has often been more spectacular; however, there was plenty of white water and the horizon was lumpy and vigorous.

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Someone had been having fun.  I pottered in a convocation of beach art.

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The moment of sun expired and the reed beds heaved in the freshening gusts, and the spindly trees leaned and moaned and thrashed.

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Full day

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Today I had enough to do.  (Click a thumbnail for the gallery)

First, make your terra sigillata

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Still in denial about the date, especially as we have scarcely seen daylight.  However:  no resolutions, but one can make an action of intent.

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First try.  Inlaid with beach clay medallion, bought animal bead, glass beads.  The white candles came slick from the moulds, the smooth finish making them look more incompetent (I thought) than the woggly hand-dipped layer I subsequently added.  Don’t like the maroon (hand did literally slip) and it was also full of tiny bubbles, due to maker ignorance, I presume.  That left me fooling about with the white beads, so as not to quarrel with the bubbles.

3-sf

Has a claim to be the earliest SF story going, as an imagination of gravity and Copernicus’ theory form part of the story.  Also has in a slightly immature form the classic SF twist:  the lunar civilisation seems utopian, with food, shelter, ordered society without friction, no need for legislation or punishment, until you find out that the newborn are inspected for signs of incipient deviancy and, if dodgy, are deported briskly to planet Earth.  This neatly places a query over utopia, while marrying new science with the mediaeval world view in which change and imperfection reside in the sublunary world.

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Also a particularly enjoyable title page, especially the verso.

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And then there is this one, which is rather like being given a cordon bleu cookery book, though much more interesting.  Instructions about how to modify your propane burner or construct a flue with your angle grinder place most of this beyond my skills, and I didn’t much care for the casual references to vaporised hydrochloric acid.  I have used a top hat raku kiln, though, (supervised!), and have done naughty raku from my electric kiln, and made bonfire clamps to fire beach clay pots, so a good deal of it spoke to me.

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So start where you can:  make some terra sigillata.  In theory it is a perfectly simple levigation process, requiring only water and patience.  If emulating the ancients, I won’t even need a rubber tube to siphon, as it should be possible to decant the layers.  Luckily beach clay is free and plentiful for experiments where you don’t know what you are doing.  As I, of course, do not.

A case of travelling hopefully?   Happy *** ****, fellow bloggers.