Monthly Archives: October 2018

Inghirami

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The moon was nearly full last night; just enough shadowed terminator to reveal some craters.

Considering that the photos were taken by a phone being held up in the vague direction of a cheap refractor, they weren’t too bad.  I couldn’t capture a complete moon image through the 25mm eyepiece, because the phone couldn’t cope with the glare.  The shorter eyepiece gives a less bright segment that the camera could manage, but the sweet spot in the 10mm eyepiece is a bit limited.

Pythagoras is the one with the peak; Sinus Iridium and Plato show up well given that they have no defining shadows:

Inghirami is a good name for a crater (its floor in shadow and tucked in behind Schickard) and I don’t think I have ever identified it before.  Grimaldi and Hevelius are further north.  Again, without shadows I am surprised that Tycho wasn’t just one flat glare:

 

A little more water

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… while I had the chance.

 

Around to it

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In the back of my mind for a long time, and fortuitously spotted on a library shelf.

Diaries are so moreish, especially when the author is a writer of any talent.  The more personal sections of these diaries have been pruned, largely in consideration for persons still living at the time of this publication, but Channon was the man who knew “everybody”, knew the gossip, knew the workings of politics, was the ultimate worldling of his small world of society and parliament in the 1930s and 40s, so his insider view is of considerable interest.

At the same time, the sheer variety and humour keep the format refreshed:  Channon’s misadventures with royal chamber pots are irresistible (p 21), as is the tendency of Queen Mary to look like the Jungfrau (p 133).  My favourite absurdity, however, occurs in November 1940, during the Blitz, when Channon’s house received a direct hit while he was holding a dinner party:  ... there was an immense crash and a flash like lightning. … we all rushed into the hall, and were at once half-blinded by dust and smoke … out of the darkness sprang an ARP warden, whom I recognised as, of all people, the Archduke Robert [of Austria] …  I led them into the morning room, gave them drinks, and rang the bell  (p 274).